General election 2017: Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May face TV grilling

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General election 2017: Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May face TV grilling
General election 2017: Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May face TV grilling

General election 2017: Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May face TV grilling

General election 2017: Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May face TV grilling
General election 2017: Jeremy Corbyn and Theresa May face TV grilling

Mrs May was asked about the Tories’ planned reforms to the way social care is funded, with a man in the audience describing the changes as a “dementia tax”.

The PM confirmed an overall cap would be put on costs, which had not been included in the Tories’ election manifesto, but did not say where this would be set.

She promised she would listen to charities and voters on where the cap should be, adding that the social care system would “collapse” without reform.

Replying to an audience member, she said spending on the NHS was increasing because she wanted a “first class” health service.

But she said it was only possible if there was a “really strong economy to pay for it”.

“That’s where the Brexit negotiations, but so much else, actually comes in,” she said.

‘Constant work’ on migration

Mrs May defended her view that richer pensioners should not receive the winter fuel payment, saying she had met pensioners who agreed with her.

She was repeatedly asked by Mr Paxman whether she had changed her mind on Brexit – having campaigned for a Remain vote before the referendum.

He said: “What one’s bound to say is that if I was sitting in Brussels and I was looking at you as the person I had to negotiate with, I’d think: ‘She’s a blowhard who collapses at the first sign of gunfire’.”

But Mrs May said: “I take the view that we can make a success of Brexit.”

The referendum had “drawn a line” under the Remain versus Leave debate, she said, adding that her decision to trigger the election was because of rival parties “trying to frustrate the process”.

On immigration, the former home secretary defended the repeated failure to hit the government’s target of reducing net migration to below 100,000.

She said there was “no single measure” to change immigration figures, describing it as a “constant work”.

Other parties’ reaction

Lib Dem Tim Farron said both leaders had committed a series of “blunders”.

He claimed Mr Corbyn had made an unfunded commitment to lift the welfare cap, and Mrs May would not say how many people would be hit by a “dementia tax”.

The SNP’s Patrick Grady said: “I think we’ve found out why the prime minister has been so reluctant to take part in leaders’ debates tonight.”

Plaid Cymru criticised the lack of mentions of Wales, and the Green Party said Mrs May had “avoided the question” on her “unfair” social care reforms

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